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China Stats for the Week: April 23-29

Posted on | April 29, 2012 | No Comments

China’s central government has moved to bar certain government agencies from buying foreign cars, potentially excluding global auto makers from a market that totals between 70 billion and 80 billion yuan ($11.1 billion to $12.7 billion).

Demand for vehicles could register single-digit growth rates for a second year in a row – the slowest back-to-back years since the market took off in the late 1990s.

Chinese consumers bought 2.1 million SUVs last year, an increase of 25 per cent and representing almost 12 per cent of total light vehicle sales, according to J.D. Power and LMC Automotive.

China’s mining sector saw 185 accidents in the first quarter of the year, that led to the deaths of 289 people, the State Administration of Work Safety said last Friday. Altogether 1,973 miners were killed in colliery accidents last year.

In 2009 China pledged billions of dollars for research on clean vehicles and called for annual sales of 500,000 cars by 2015.  Developers have yet to achieve breakthroughs and will be lucky to sell 2,000 cars this year, mostly taxis.

In 2011, the National Bureau of Statistics said the percentage of China’s population living in cities reached 51.3 percent. The figure was only 36.2 percent in 2000.

A study by the State Council’s Development Research Center (DRC) said that by 2030 nearly 67 percent of China’s population would live in cities. This represents an extra 300 million people compared to the number in 2012.

China is now home to 158 million migrant workers and their salaries increased by 21.2 percent from 2010 to 2011, according to the National Bureau of Statistics.

Nearly half of migrant workers, the survey found, still work in the coastal provinces of Guangdong, Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Shandong.

Last year, migrants’ average monthly salaries increased by 21.2 percent, rising to 2,049 yuan ($324). They worked 8.8 hours a day on average and 25.4 days a month.

More than 84.5 percent reported toiling for more than 44 hours a week – exceeding the legal limit on work time.

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